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Home » Products » Speciality » Previous Catalogues » Mid Summer 2019 » Page 56-57 Grasses, Borders and Hedges » DUTCH BOX

DUTCH BOX
50mm Pot

Dutch Box (Buxus sempervirens suffruticosa) is a slow growing evergreen dwarf shrub with glossy green oval foliage and a very dense growth habit. Shade tolerant, will produce a good quality hedge in cooler climates.

Buxus plants are a traditional favourite, as they are perfect for formal evergreen hedges. Small glossy green leaves on a compact dense shrub, make them perfect for clipping or topiary. They are relatively slow growing, and shade tolerant.

Supplied as a potted plant.

  • Frost tolerant once established
  • Suitable for areas with full sun
  • Suitable for areas with part shade
  • Suitable for areas with full shade
  • Ideal in pots or containers
  • Grows 50 cm wide
  • Grows to 50cm high
  • Ideal Growing Regions:
  • Cool
  • Temperate
  • Arid
  • Semi-arid
  • Mild Tropical
  • View growing regions on the Climate Map

Availability: OUT OF STOCK/OUT OF SEASON! Available to order most of the year, unless sold out.

$4.40

9 in stock

Common Name: LANDSCAPING POTS GENERAL CARE
Plant Type: Tube stock, young plants.
Planting Width: Refer to the catalogue or additional information on specific varieties.
Positioning: Depends on the plant; refer to catalogue for specific information.
General Information: Landscaping pots are young plants, which are quite young and have a small root system. As they are a young plant care must be taken to ensure their survival by following specific watering, fertilising and planting guidelines. When you receive your order – Gently remove the packaging. Your landscaping pots will require a water when you first receive them. A short soak in a container of water making sure they are wet from the top right through to the bottom. It is recommended you let your plants recuperate from their travelling for a few days before planting. Unpack and place them in a semi-shaded area away from the hot afternoon sun for a few days. Water gently as required until damp. Do not over or under water. We advise that you also water your plants thoroughly approx. half hour prior to planting, this will assist removing your plant from its container.
PLANTING
To remove your plant, place your fingers either side of the plants stem covering the top of the container so no potting media falls out. Turn the container upside down and with your other hand gently squeeze the sides and bottom of the
container and then lift away from the plant. Plant into your prepared area. Once they are in the ground settle them in with a good watering.
Planting Depth – When you plant your plants the soil level should be equal to that of the media in the tube. Planting too deep could cause rotting and the death of your plants, raised planting may be a good idea in boggy areas.
Fertilising – Your plants already contain a small amount of slow release fertiliser. This should last them 6-8 weeks after purchase. When they do require feeding again we would recommend a slow release fertiliser such as Osmocote or
Nutracote, or an organic product such as Dynamic Lifter or Organic Life. These products should be used as directed.
Please note: Do not put fertiliser directly into the planting hole, as this will most likely burn the roots.
Delayed Planting – If you are unable to plant straight away, your containers can be kept together in a safe place. They must be kept moist and put in a partly sunny position away from hot afternoon sun. For plant spacing and general information about your specific varieties please refer to the catalogue you purchased from.
MAINTENANCE
The ongoing maintenance of your landscaping plants will depend on their type and use.
Hedges – formal hedges require more attention to achieve and keep in their defined shape but can occupy less space than an informal hedge. Whilst growing to the required size, some trimming is usually beneficial to encourage side growth and more dense foliage from ground level up. Keep in mind the importance of light when creating your desired shape so that foliage lower down the hedge receives sufficient light to encourage healthy, even growth. Slower growing species require more patience to establish but have the reward of less regular maintenance once the desired size is attained. Avoid trimming at times when new growth could be affected by frosts.
Groundcovers – use mulch to control weeds and retain moisture while plants are establishing themselves. Some groundcovers will grow more quickly than other so ensure more active plants do not encroach on less active ones or
beyond your intended space. Remember that areas with many groundcovers will have competing root systems and when required, water in a manner that each receives their share.
Climbers – evergreen climbers can be trimmed as necessary to keep the desired shape and prevent them encroaching on other plants. Periodic trimming will generally be better than infrequent, more severe maintenance. Ensure plants have adequate support and prune to encourage growth in the desired direction. Some species, particularly deciduous ones, may benefit from the removal of old wood to encourage new growth.
Tips: Will need to be protected from extreme heat, frosts and strong winds for at least their first growing season until established.

Legend


Establish which coloured region you live in and then consider the varieties listed as typically suited to that area. The Australian Climate Guide map is intended as a guide only as climatic conditions vary between specific locations. Factors such as local altitude, wind and the proximity of hills, mountains and bodies of water can cause variations from the generalised climate map. Note also that although a plant may be listed as suitable for a particular region, it may still require protection from extremes such as frost or strong winds. You should also consider its requirements for sun, shade and water.

Remember that you can often extend the range of plants that you can grow by creating micro-climates within your garden. Planting under trees, beside brick walls or in the shelter of a building, on high or low points in the garden can all have an effect. Even planting by a pond or surrounded by rocks can be used to advantage. Part of the joy of gardening can be experimenting and nothing is more pleasing that achieving success with a plant that is not usually seen in your area.

The map is based on Australian Bureau of Meteorology 30 year climatology data from 1961-1990. The zones are based on both temperature and humidity:

  • Tropical – hot humid summer .
  • Mild Tropical – warm humid summer
  • Semi-arid – hot dry summer, cold winter
  • Arid – hot dry summer, cold winter
  • Temperate – warm summer, cool winter
  • Cool – mild-warm summer, cool winter