Geisha Girl

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Geisha Girl

Postby abwal » Mon Mar 05, 2007 5:23 pm

Duranta Geisha Girl

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Postby tilly » Mon Mar 05, 2007 6:23 pm

Abwal your Geisha Girl looks lovely.....very big......I am worried I planted one about 18inches from a wall a few months ago.....do you think I should move it out further....and if so when...sorry just looking at yours has got me worried....
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Postby Patricia » Mon Mar 05, 2007 6:54 pm

Tilly ..I have a few geisha girls planted in my garden....several of them I have kept pruned into standards...if yours has a good trunk shape you could perhaps consider doing this...if you don't mind pruning them you could keep at a good size...BTW Abwal yours looks beautiful..I have noticed mine are flowering well at the moment!!
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Postby Lin » Mon Mar 05, 2007 7:12 pm

Hadn't seen geisha girl in flower before, looks good, abwal
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Postby abwal » Mon Mar 05, 2007 8:02 pm

tilly, this one is pruned only when it tries to take over from another plant/tree/shrub. We also use them as hedge plants at our beach house where they are pruned and kept under fairly strict control. If you want lots of flowers, you need to let it grow fairly freely. As Patricia says, you can prune and train them and they don't seem to mind, but they will not flower quite as well. They move easily and grow readily from cutting.

Why not leave it where it is and follow Patricia's advice? If you want a large one with lots of flowers you can plant some of the pieces you prune off. This way you can have the best of both.
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Postby Pokie » Tue Mar 06, 2007 7:19 am

It looks fantastic abwal. :)
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Postby Luzy » Wed Mar 07, 2007 6:13 am

Pokie's right - it does look fantastic. Lovely to see it having such a nice time flowering. :D
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Postby farmgirl » Tue Mar 13, 2007 9:27 pm

My mum has a few of geisha girls i have tryed cutting and planting but thay die after a week how do i get cuttings and make it grow in my garden, i have tryed different spots in the garden but all dies. how do you do it. please help as thay are so pretty to have.
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Postby abwal » Wed Mar 14, 2007 7:40 pm

farmgirl, any type of cutting of Geisha Girl. It does not seem to matter whether you use hard or soft wood. We strike all our cuttings in sharp sand. Hormone powder will help but is not essential. Just put some sand into a pot and push the cuttings in to a depth of about 1cm (as many as will fit in the pot). Keep the sand moist and you should be right. When the cuttings start to make a few new leaves, pull one out to check root development. If there are a few roots, pot the cuttings into individual pots of potting mix. When you think the plants are ready, plant them out in the garden. I like to provide a bit of shade for new plants. A leafy twig is good for this because as the leaves die the new plant gets more sun. ( Yes I have had some of these twigs start to grow, but you can always pull them out).
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Postby farmgirl » Wed Mar 14, 2007 10:54 pm

thanks for your help abwal, i have tryed everythink but not sand in a pot. i will try again. i get so mad with myself i get to like a plant and try to grow it, everythink always dies on me. im hopless at gardening

thank you again.
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Postby abwal » Thu Mar 15, 2007 10:03 am

farmgirl, there is always someone on these forums who can help if you have a problem. Never hesitate to ask. No one is hopeless at gardening. You possibly may just need a little help to get you under way. Remember, we were all beginners once and probably faced the same problems you now face.

If you need any more info. on the Geisha Girl just ask - you can send a PM if you would prefer.
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