Chinese Star Jasmine

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Chinese Star Jasmine

Postby Gavin » Tue Oct 16, 2007 7:38 pm

Help!

I have an area of about 6 meters long by approx 0.5 - 0.6 high which is covered by a trellace.

I would like to plant a climber to completely cover this, preferrably an evergreen.

I am looking at Chinese star Jamine. The area is in a part shade (morning sun) position.

Can someone tell me, how many plats I would need to completely cover this (plant spacing)

Cheers

Gavin :?
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Postby The Mop » Tue Oct 16, 2007 10:29 pm

Part shade will make for happy jasmines, irrespective of where it is.
In Sydney, we’ve had star jasmines getting the time to completely cover areas of 2 metres high by 2 metres wide.
The height to cover is not great, so there will be a fair bit of lateral guiding to do.
It also depends on how fast it has to go, and they can overlap for a dense look.
I’d say 6, spaced 1 metre apart, with the outer ones ½ a metre from the ends.
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Postby huxter » Wed Oct 17, 2007 7:22 am

My Star Jasmines face north east, and are behind my potting shed , so get some afternoon shade .Two plants have taken over a fence 3 mts long and 2 mts high ,and I prune them to that size . They are almost a metre deep as well.This year, with even less water than usual ,has been their best flowering in memory. Sensational looking and a perfume that is almost overwhelming.

Great garden spectacle when flowering and a great cover when not.

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Postby Grasshopper » Wed Oct 17, 2007 7:37 am

Can someone tell me the best way to propergate this please
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Postby Craigster » Wed Oct 17, 2007 8:21 am

Star jasmine has adventitious roots, which means they have preformed root initials at the base of the nodes on thier stems. Hence star jasmine is extremely easy to propagate by cuttings. They'll even put roots out after putting the cuttings in a glass of water - they strike that readily!
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Postby karyn » Wed Oct 17, 2007 8:29 am

I'm not sure if I have the right jasmine or not, but I'm going to warn you against it! It is invasive via runners along the ground and under the ground, and it can be brutal for hayfever sufferers, especially in the evening. I only have to walk past a garden with jasmine in it and my eyes start running and my nose twitches unbearably! The trellis needs also to be very firmly fixed as jasmine will weigh it down. If none of this will bother you, go for it! You can get plants at most nurseries, I'm not sure how to propagate it but i assume the runners set roots so if you have access to someone elses, there may be runners you could dig. All i know is how to kill the damn stuff!! I can't remember what you wrote about the location you have chosen, have you considered hardenbergia instead? It doesn't like hard frosts, and can get woody in the middle, but comes in 3 main colours (violet, white and pink) and is a native so needs little water after establishing. H. Happy wanderer or H. Violaceae (spelling??) are common. If you plant a violet and a white it is very pretty when flowering.
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Postby Craigster » Wed Oct 17, 2007 8:58 am

Karyn's right, they can become a problem. If you look after them properly they are pretty readily kept in check. Hardenbergias are nice too, and some native Pandoreas are good. P. jasminoides and P. pandorana each have several cultivars that might suit your needs.
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Postby DuffGardens » Wed Oct 17, 2007 10:30 am

Two sides of the fence of my backyard are covered with Chinese Jasmine Star vines. They are spaced about 2-3 meters apart and completely cover the whole fence. I'm not sure how long they have been there (I only just moved in a few months ago) but I can tell you they grow fast! Every week or two I have to cut them back to stop them getting into my vegetable pots.
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Postby Grasshopper » Wed Oct 17, 2007 1:18 pm

Thanks for answer--I have some growing well here and wanted to put some more in the retaining wall sort of a ground cover
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Postby The Mop » Wed Oct 17, 2007 10:24 pm

I'm not sure if I have the right jasmine or not, but I'm going to warn you against it! It is invasive via runners along the ground and under the ground,

Image

That’ll be Jasminum Polyanthum, a climber and runner with leaves looking like the orange jasmine.
It’s classified as having a medium invasive potential.
We had one, running in all directions, until I pulled it out, and put it in a hanging basket.
The star jasmine is used as a ground cover in places, and is not classified as invasive.
Sydney Water has a good plant site:

http://www.sydneywater.com.au/SavingWat ... tSelector/
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Postby froglover » Thu Oct 18, 2007 4:56 pm

Chinese Star Jasmine or Trachelspernum jasminoides, is a lovely medium growing climber and ground cover with a heavenly perfume. We have it growing below our rear deck and whilst it has been quite slow to get going, it is now starting to get a bit of a move on and is looking lovely. This is what it looks like - flowers are more like pin-wheels than regular jasmine.


Image

We also have Pandorea 'Lady Di' which is a really beautiful, fast-growing native climber with white trumpet flowers.

Image


And I agree that the Hardenbergias are also a great alternative - I have about 4 or 5 of them in the native garden. :)

Here's more about it Star Jasmine -
http://www.hellohello.com.au/star.html
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Postby karyn » Thu Oct 18, 2007 7:54 pm

It is pretty, but i'll have to disagree on the heavenly perfume! I find it cloying and horrible. But i'm feeling sooky because everytime i went outside today, my eyes watered and my nose ran and i clawed at my face until i just gave up and went back to bed. And that's despite 2 telfast and 4 squirts of the strongest rhinocort. I'm blaming the oat grass. And the jasmine! Look up clematis too, there's some absolutely breathtaking ones around. And I remember a climber called black eyed susan from when I was a kid, it kept dying on me, but i loved it.
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Postby Sam » Fri Oct 19, 2007 6:59 am

Karyn - heard Shannon Lush on ABC last week. For hayfever she suggested sniffing a damp tea bag (must be ordinary old black tea, not green). That might help you.
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cinnamon make it Greek, soya sauce makes it Chinese, Garlic
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Postby mishy » Mon Oct 22, 2007 1:14 pm

What a beautiful flower!!!!
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Re: Chinese Star Jasmine

Postby bennos » Mon Dec 08, 2008 2:39 pm

I was going to start a new topic relating to star jasmines but came across this one, I'll just add to it rather then start one.

I planted 12 star jasmines into a new garden yesterday. As per usual, I watered it in after I laid the mulch down.

My question is: how often should I water it in the establishment stage? And when they are settled/established, how often should I water them then?

I'm thinking to water every 2nd day for the 1st two weeks, then every three days for the next three weeks, then twice a week until 8 weeks. After 8 weeks just once a week or even fortnight. Advice needed?!!

Oh and, what to do regarding fertilizer? I'm thinking a week after first planting, then again every fortnight until 8 weeks. Maybe use Charlie Carp or a liquid ynamic Lifter and water it in. By the way, I mixed Dynamic Lifter pallets into the soil around the plants at planting.

Just in case you're wondering, I don't know where I got 8 weeks from. Must have read it somewhere!
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Re: Chinese Star Jasmine

Postby The Estate » Tue Dec 09, 2008 8:36 am

a drink of seasol every week for a month would help establish the root system bennos (Y) Jasmines are pretty tuff so after the first month a water every week should be fine (Y) cept on really hot days a drink would not go astray (#)
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Re: Chinese Star Jasmine

Postby abwal » Tue Dec 09, 2008 6:24 pm

Watering really depends on how fast the plant uses it, the type of soil and the climate. In similar situations, I move a little of the mulch near the plant and scratch the surface. If it is dry, water is needed. If it is damp, don't water. An awful lot of plants are killed by overwatering.
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Re: Chinese Star Jasmine

Postby bennos » Thu Dec 11, 2008 1:54 pm

The Estate wrote:a drink of seasol every week for a month would help establish the root system bennos (Y) Jasmines are pretty tuff so after the first month a water every week should be fine (Y) cept on really hot days a drink would not go astray (#)

Bought Seasol but haven't had to use it yet. Since planting it has rained every 2nd day. How considerate of the rain to follow my intended watering schedule!!

Good advice abwal. Sounds logical.
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